3 Common Symptoms You Did Not Know Were Related to Diastasis Recti

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Diastasis recti is a separation of the abdominal wall where the connective tissue that runs directly down the center of your tummy – the linea alba – is stretched and weak. While diastasis recti is a diagnosis, it is also a symptom of something larger. When you have a weak internal corset muscle (known as your transverse abdominis) and are unaware of chronic movements and postures that consistently create forward forceful pressure on the linea alba, it can create a diastasis. When the muscles of the abdominal wall are not firmly connected and strong, the body suffers.

Diastasis Graphic

Learn More About This Condition

Most people do not realize that many of the common ailments and physical conditions we all struggle with could be related to a separated abdominal wall and a weakened corset muscle.

Here are three of the most common symptoms presented with diastasis recti:

1. Low Back Pain 

Low back pain is so common in our culture that many people consider it normal and do not realize that they may be able to eliminate it altogether. When the internal abdominal wall is weak and a diastasis creates more disconnection, the lack of support for the spine causes the body to collapse. This places the spine in a rounded and strained position contributing to that achy low back. In addition, a separated abdominal wall decreases the stability of the pelvis which contributes to sacroiliac instability – a very common cause of low back pain. Then, because of this collapsed posture and pelvic instability, the posterior hip muscles tend to overcompensate which contributes to sciatica (another common low back complaint).

chronically collapsed posture leads to back pain

chronically collapsed posture leads to back pain

2. Bulging Tummy 

Whether we are talking about that postpartum tummy that lasts far beyond the expectation, or the tummy that does not seem to go away even when you lose weight or spend hours on traditional ab workouts, it is likely from diastasis recti. Diastasis recti weakens the abdominal wall and the thin connective tissue provides little to no support for the abdominal organs. Without the strong support, the organs protrude outward creating that stubborn poochy tummy. In addition, those well-intended abdominal exercises are likely causing the tummy to bulge more by putting more pressure on the connective tissue. Traditional ab exercises tend to minimize the proper activation of the internal core muscles which help elongate and flatten your tummy.

Crunches-DR

Learn Why Crunches Don’t Work!

 3. Pelvic Floor Issues

The media has influenced us to believe that stress incontinence (leaking urine unintentionally when you jump, sneeze or run) is not only normal, but something to joke about. The mass number of feminine incontinence products on the market tells you how common this issue has become. What most people do not realize is how a weak pelvic floor is directly connected to a weak internal core and poor pelvic alignment. Diastasis recti contributes to the inability of the transverse abdominis to effectively support the abdominal organs, allowing them to rest too low in the pelvic bowl. This extra pressure combined with common compensation strategies – like holding the breath and bracing – pushes down on the pelvic floor placing too much demand on the sphincters responsible for controlling the flow of urine. Pelvic organ prolapse, painful intercourse in women, and inflamed prostate in men are also connected to diastasis recti and core weakness.

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While we’ve highlighted just three symptoms here, diastasis recti can also contribute to: mid back and upper back pain, chronic rib instability, constipation and intestinal issues, and poor fetal alignment and childbirth complications. A functionally strong and connected core is essential to your overall health. Understanding how diastasis recti can contribute to common, frustrating physical ailments could be the key in helping you feel better and live an active, pain-free life.

The Tummy Team specializes in reversing diastasis recti while rebuilding your true core strength to help you live the life you were meant to live. We have various effective online courses, or you can come to see is in our clinic located in Camas, WA. Restore your core today!

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163 responses to “3 Common Symptoms You Did Not Know Were Related to Diastasis Recti”

  1. Tammie says:

    I live in Louisville Ky. Can you help me find a doctor who specializes in this. I desperately need your help. Thank you.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Tammie! I am so sorry we didn’t see this comment sooner! I wasn’t getting notifications of blog comments 🙁
      I would LOVE to talk to you about how we can help. We don’t currently have any trained practitioners in your area, but our online programs are very effective. To apologize for the extreme delay, I would like to offer you a generous discount on our services. Please email me at Grace@thetummyteam.com so we can talk further.

  2. Hello my name is Jason and I had a diastasis recti repair 44 months ago and I still get pains when done eating and I do deal with constipation and bloating. Do you think the repair has split or can it be something else. My surgeon is on sick leave so I’m seeing a new surgeon and asking him to let me get an ultrasound done. I workout 3 times a week and learned how to do safe workouts. Please any knowledge you have would help. It’s weird before the diastasis recti I never had these issues it just bothered me that my stomach would blow out when I bent over but now after surgery 44 months of having pains and a bulge.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Jason,
      I am so sorry we didn’t see this comment sooner!
      I would LOVE to talk to you about how our PT’s can help with the issues you are having post-surgery if you are still interested. To apologize for the extreme delay, I would like to offer you a generous discount on our virtual appointments. Please email me at Grace@thetummyteam.com so we can talk further.

  3. Kimberly Smith says:

    I am just discovering this condition and it is exactly describing my physical struggles that I have been dealing with for 14 years!!! I have 14 year old twin daughters. My belly is very large, I have a hernia, I have back pain, I have had major digestive issues for 14 years, with horrible gas and discomfort. It has lead me to have very low self esteem and I have basically given up on myself. I use to be an avid runner, toned and athletic. But since having my children and having constant belly discomfort and over all body pain on a regular basis, I have succumbed to my situation. I now know there is help. Am I a person that can be helped afar 14 years? Tears are running down my cheeks as I type this. I am so disappointed that my ob doctor never even suggested this to me or encouraged me to look into this. My twin daughters were very healthy babies, weighing in at 6.13 and 7.4 and I delivered a 10′ placenta. My belly was extremely stretched beyond a level of comfort and I was told by people that they had never seen someone so largely pregnant. What do I do about this? Where do I start? Should I consider physical therapy? Any help you might have, I would appreciate. Thank you. Kimberly

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Kimberly,

      It is NEVER too late to fix this! The body has an incredible capacity to heal under the right circumstances. I am sorry your OB didn’t mention this, but unfortunately that is fairly common. 🙁 OB/GYN’s are trained mostly just to asses the health of the baby during pregnancy/delivery, not so much the health of mom’s core.
      I would really love to talk with you about your story and your symptoms, and how we can help you heal after all these years. I am confident that we can help you feel better and more confident. Please email me at Grace@thetummyteam.com so we can talk further.

    • Barbara frisoen says:

      Hi Kimberly. I felt compelled to answer you. I have a 15 year old son delivered CSection. I have never been the same. I went for pelvic floor therapy did not help. Acupuncture relief but not permanent. I am a personal trainer. Exercised. Didn’t help. Your story is my story. Digestive issues, painful painful sex (I left my significant other just not to have sex) now I am alone. I finally went to a plastic surgeon and scheduled the surgery. I have lived and struggled with this for 14 years. I am done. Doctors will never discuss this with you. It took my OB years to figure out I had a prolapse and sent me to PT. I actively went at my problems for years. I believe surgery is the way to go. Best of luck to you.

  4. Kimberly Smith says:

    I am just discovering this condition and it is exactly describing my physical struggles that I have been dealing with for 14 years!!! I have 14 year old twin daughters. My belly is very large, I have a hernia, I have back pain, I have had major digestive issues for 14 years, with horrible gas and discomfort. It has lead me to have very low self esteem and I have basically given up on myself. I use to be an avid runner, toned and athletic. But since having my children and having constant belly discomfort and over all body pain on a regular basis, I have succumbed to my situation. I now know there is help. Am I a person that can be helped afar 14 years? Tears are running down my cheeks as I type this. I am so disappointed that my ob doctor never even suggested this to me or encouraged me to look into this. My twin daughters were very healthy babies, weighing in at 6.13 and 7.4 and I delivered a 10′ placenta. My belly was extremely stretched beyond a level of comfort and I was told by people that they had never seen someone so largely pregnant. What do I do about this? Where do I start? Should I consider physical therapy? Any help you might have, I would appreciate. Thank you. Kimberly

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Kimberly,

      It is NEVER too late to fix this! The body has an incredible capacity to heal under the right circumstances. I am sorry your OB didn’t mention this, but unfortunately that is fairly common. 🙁 OB/GYN’s are trained mostly just to asses the health of the baby during pregnancy/delivery, not so much the health of mom’s core.
      I would really love to talk with you about your story and your symptoms, and how we can help you heal after all these years. I am confident that we can help you feel better and more confident. Please email me at Grace@thetummyteam.com so we can talk further.

  5. TheTummyTeam says:

    Tammie! I am so sorry we didn’t see this comment sooner! I wasn’t getting notifications of blog comments 🙁
    I would LOVE to talk to you about how we can help. We don’t currently have any trained practitioners in your area, but our online programs are very effective. To apologize for the extreme delay, I would like to offer you a generous discount on our services. Please email me at Grace@thetummyteam.com so we can talk further.

  6. Post19 Deb says:

    I had full term twins 19 years ago 6 lbs 9oz and 6lbs 12oz. Several months after birth I was still having servere pain and incontinence. My OBGYN referred me to a physical therapist, that I saw for over a year. The therapy helped to a degree but didn’t stop the severe leaking with sneezing, jumping, coughing, etc. I have been dealing with major lowerback problems, pelvic floor issues, and sifting hips. I see a chiropractor on a regular basis in an attempt to keep my posture, hips, and back in line. I recently heard of diastasis recti from a cosmetic surgeon. I am wondering if having a tummy tuck would alleviate some of my post 19 years symptoms and would this procedure be covered by my health insurance?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Thank you for your comment. A tummy tuck is almost always considered cosmetic and is therefore not covered by insurance. But even if it were, I would not recommend it. In our experience this is at best a band-aid but doesn’t solve the problem. Because it doesn’t address the root of the problem — core strength and proper body mechanics — over time you will likely re-injure the area through daily movements that put pressure against the linea alba. We can help! I know it’s been a long time that you’ve been dealing with this and I know you have tried other things and must feel out of options. But I am confident we can help you heal and live strong.

  7. Allison says:

    I am experiencing pain to the right of my belly button, but no protrusion. It seems to some how be connected with the muscles that help me eliminate, because those functions often cause similar pain as well. I’ve also had digestive dysfunction(“IBS”) for almost 10 years, and just had my first baby in march 2016. Don’t know if this sounds like diastasis?

    • Jackie says:

      I am having alomkst the exact same symptoms. Mine started after a bout of stomach flu about 8 months ago, although I have had back pain, poor posture, neck and shoulder tension, and frequent ribs out of place on the same side. My chiropractor checked and says I have a 2 finger DR.

  8. Ann Starkey says:

    Help, please! I have most, if not all, of the symptoms discussed above. My belly is so large. Dieting doesn’t work. I lose and gain, lose and gain, but nothing ever comes off my abdomen. I am so desperate to find help in the Pittsburgh area. Any assistance would be appreciated.

  9. Niki Ladymon says:

    When ever I attempt a sit up… sit up to fast or bend over too fast Something twist up and gets knotted temporarily and I can see an actual indent sometimes on my stomach when it happens… I have been checked for hernias I don’t have one. Could this possibly be diastasis recti? And all these years after giving birth to 4 children no one has ever mentioned this? My son weighed 10.2 lbs and I’m 5 foot 2. I knew he did some damage. I had to wear a brace to support my stomach he pulled on my little body so bad. So if it is.. is it too late to correct aafter 21 years?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Niki – yes, that sounds exactly like diastasis recti. I am sorry none of your physicians mentioned it to you before. Unfortunately this is widely underdiagnosed and often mistreated. It is NEVER too late. Your body has an amazing capacity to heal and it craves to be whole and in alignment. When we do just a few simple things to help get it there, it takes care of the rest.

      We would LOVE to work with you.

      If you want to measure yourself for diastasis and learn more about it, go here: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/symptoms/diastasis-recti/

  10. Sherri says:

    My daughter just had surgery because her doctor told her she had a hernia. The only test he did prior to surgery was an ultrasound of her gallbladder. He said she needed the gallbladder removed because she had a polyp and he thought that could be causing her bloating. So he would do hernia repair and remove gallbladder at same time. After surgery he says she did not have a hernia but diastasis recti. I have been reading about that and am concerned why no one diagnosed this before surgery. Am wondering if gallbladder surgery was not necessary and why a test was not done to confirm hernia prior to putting her thru this. She has complained of pain for 3 years since first child was born and now has two. The pics I see of the diastasis rect is identical to her stomach.
    why did no doctor see this? Any insight is appreciated

  11. Kris says:

    My ob did this when they did my hysterectomy in 2013 said do not gain weight did not tell me what would happen. Well I ended up with diabetes on a medication that caused weight gain and now I’m in pain all the time. I wish I was told this was going to be done and what could happen.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Kris – I am sorry about your experience. Are you still experiencing pain? Do you know if you have diastasis? I would love to talk to you more about your symptoms and see how we can help. Will you email me at Grace@TheTummyTeam.com ??

  12. Sheila says:

    I have recently been diagnosed with diastasis recti after having a colon resection and I am experiencing some terrible symptoms. I have a huge upper belly and am experiencing pain. My pain was so bad two days ago my blood pressure shot up to 186/144 and ended up in the hospital. I’ve gone through PT for a few weeks without any results. I saw a plastic surgeon who said the pain wasn’t from the diastasis recti. He thought it may be related to my colon. Does anyone have a comment that may help me find an answer?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Sheila:
      I am so sorry about your experience. I think a virtual session with one of our PT’s would be really beneficial for you to discuss these things and then follow up with our online core training. We are trying a new system for our virtual sessions and need some “guinea pigs” 😉 I would love to give you the 1-hour session with a specialist free of charge so we can test it out. Will you email me at Grace@TheTummyTeam.com to set this up?

  13. Chris says:

    Hi, I am 35 years old women. I have a baby girl who is now 5 years old. I was fine and well. I had a very slim figure before having my daughter. From the moment I conceive my daughter I felt a pulling kind of pain from behind my belly button. This pain lasted until after 6 months of giving birth to my daughter. I must say my belly did look quiet huge and looked like as it was hanging down towards my leg. She was nearly 8 pounds and quiet a tall girl.
    I had a very difficult labour and it was prolonged together with alot of pushing etc. I guess all of that didn’t help. Then later on after giving birth I was diagnosed​ with Diastasis recti. Because I wanted to have more children at that point they discharge me without any treatment. Then a year later I have started developing some sort of pain in the stomach, bloating, passing gas etc. I always look 4 months pregnant. Now the biggest problem for me is that I am having severe pains and has gone through 3 consecutive misscarriges​. The doctor’s have checked me and said there is nothing wrong with my digestive system or no other obvious complications. Has anyone here had problem getting pregnant after this condition?? Looking forward to hear.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Chris – I am grieving with you about your miscarriages. I am so sorry. *I* don’t know if there is a connection but I do know that Kelly – our founder – will have a lot of insight into this. She had severe diastasis for years and had 5 miscarriages throughout her childbearing years. I think you would really benefit from a virtual appointment to discuss these things. We are starting to use a new system for our “eSessions” and need some people to help test the system. We would love to give you a 1-hour session for free so we can test it out. Will you email me at Grace@TheTummyTeam.com to set this up?

  14. Sid says:

    My muscle diastasis occurred with my first child. Eight years later I was able to have twins.and it didn’t cause any complications with my pregnancy.

  15. Sheree Psaila says:

    I’m 23 years old, I had a little boy a year ago. I also have a rare physical disability and I am 4ft tall… I defied odds of having a baby, although I definitely don’t regret it, I’m suffering for it now. All of the symptoms above are exactly what I have. Bulging stomach but even my belly button sticks out, constipation, pelvic/lower abdominal pain, sometimes back pain… There’s really no one in Australia that has been able to help me ?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Sheree – Wow! Way to go! You know, the body is capable of some pretty amazing things. I think we could absolutely help you. A significant portion of our online clients are in Australia. It seems there are some needs for PT’s who specialize in this over there. We actually have 1 specialist we are about to train now and hoping for more. But I digress…. I think you definitely need to do our Core Foundations Online Program and you most definitely need at least 1, if not 2, virtual appointments so we can tailor your program to your needs. Kelly will be able to address specific things to your condition.

      I can give you 1 virtual appointment for free and give you 10% off our online program. Will you email me at Grace@TheTummyTeam.com to set this up?

  16. TheTummyTeam says:

    Allison — it may or may not be diastasis but it’s definitely a symptom of functional core weakness. When clients struggle with things like eliminating the bowels and having an efficient digestive tract, it’s usually because of inadequate pressure from the abdominal wall. Your core is supposed to support your organs and when it is weak and deflated, you end up with symptoms like IBS. The pain you feel could be the start of a hernia so I would highly recommend you do some core strengthening and core training with us. In the mean time, we have some resources on “Potty Posture” and How to Lift in the Infographics section of our free resources here: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/resources/

    And here we have more info on Diastasis Recti as well as a video on how to check yourself for it: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/symptoms/diastasis-recti/

  17. TheTummyTeam says:

    Ann – I am so sorry this has been so hard for you. I know what it’s like to feel out of control of this! 🙁
    We don’t currently have any trained practitioners in your area, but our online programs are very effective. We would love to work with you. If you do want to find someone in your area, I would recommend printing out the questions we suggest on this blog to help “interview” PT’s to see if they can address this well.

    https://thetummyteam.com/questions-core-rehab-specialist/

  18. TheTummyTeam says:

    Sherri – I am so sorry about her experience 🙁 Unfortunately this has been a common theme in the clients we see. We are working really hard to educate more practitioners about diastasis and that it CAN be treated. Historically there has been little understanding of this condition and very little real treatment plans and so it is often overlooked by physicians. I am sorry that it didn’t get caught sooner, but even after surgery, it can totally be rehabilitated and your daughter can be living stronger than ever. We have been treating clients with stories like this for a long time. We can definitely help. Will you have your daughter email Grace@thetummyteam.com to talk about other symptoms and get the right program? We can talk about discounts too 😉

  19. TheTummyTeam says:

    Sheila:
    I am so sorry about your experience. I think a virtual session with one of our PT’s would be really beneficial for you to discuss these things and then follow up with our online core training. We are trying a new system for our virtual sessions and need some “guinea pigs” 😉 I would love to give you the 1-hour session with a specialist free of charge so we can test it out. Will you email me at Grace@TheTummyTeam.com to set this up?

  20. Liani says:

    Hi there.
    I had twins (one baby weighed 3.1kg and the other one 3.6kg at birth) a little over 2 years ago. I went to see a specialist a year ago and it was confirmed that I do have diastis recti. I was told there is nothing I can do and my medical won’t pay for it as it is classified as cosmetic surgery.
    I’m feeling extremely concerned as it is causing me a lot more than than upper, lower and mid back pain. I have to restrain from to much physical movement as my tummy starts to hurt. If I move to much I get extreme pain just underneath my ribs. It almost feels like my organs are taking a punch. It really hurts. And to top it all off I am gaining a lot of weight because I cannot move to much. The other day I was playing on the floor with my twins and my little girl. We were rolling around on the floor while I was tickling them and all of a sudden it was like my entire tummy went into a spasm. Today I was just doing general house work (dishes and vacuuming my floors and picking my twins up here and there) and now I’m sitting with this pain underneath my ribs. Sometimes it feels like something is moving inside when I make a sudden movement.
    Do you perhaps know what this could be?
    I am arranging with my medical aid to go to the specialist again but I’m hoping you can guide me until then. Do you think exercise can fix this? I’m too scared to even try exercising as I’ve had so much pain when I am “too active” at any given day.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Liani,

      I am so sorry for all of the discomfort and pain you’ve been in. The “movement” you feel inside is exactly what you thought…your organs are unsupported. When we have a diastasis (a gap) of the abdominal wall, our organs lack the support to keep them up an in. So gravity just pushes them down and out — causing that common belly bulge. And it can feel very painful.

      Traditional exercises won’t help heal this and can actually make it worse. But our rehab program is gentle and realistic. We can help you rehabilitate the core muscles, improve all that pain you are in, and get you back to working out. I would love to talk to you more about this. Would you like to email me at Grace@TheTummyTeam.com??

  21. Laurie says:

    After my second daughter, I was super thin as was after my first. I had gone for a sonogram bc there seemed to be a bump on the top of my stomach when I lean back. Sonogram came out fine and my dr said that it was probably a stretched muscle from pregnancy. Fast forward- nine years later, I suddenly start to slowly gain weight without changing my healthy eating habits. The weight keeps coming onto my legs, stomach, and everywhere else. I cannot lose weight and have gained at least 15 lbs out of nowhere. It’s been 3 years and I still cannot lose weight. Now I have a fat wardrobe and it’s very depressing!! Do I need a gastroenterologist?? Help!! Also my upper stomach always feels very bloated and I cannot eat much at once. I also experience major stomach discomfort every single moment of every single day. Help!

  22. Cami says:

    I am just reading this. I just realized that I have all of the issues that you mentioned . I have IBS and I have had a partial hysterectomy and bladder sling. My back hurts and went to chiropractor. Does relieve pain but only temporary. I had a very difficult labor and ended up with emergency c-section with almost 9 lb baby. I have lost weight but always have the pouch. My doctor told me I have diastasis Recti and only thing that will work is surgery. I do not want surgery and this sounds like it might be the answer I have been looking for!!

  23. Stephanie says:

    Hi! I’m so glad that I found this post. I’m 31 with 3 children (all c sections). I was told that I had a hernia as well as dr. I had no idea my severe back pain was due to my back pain. I’m in constant pain….raising 3 children doesn’t help this. I’m so frustrated that I still look pregnant (my youngest is 3). I wasn’t even told about the dr…. a friend had to tell me. When I asked the doctor about, she nonchalantly said “oh, there’s nothing you can do about that”. So I’m going to be in pain forever? Am I always going to have stomach issues? So frustrating!!!

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Stephanie,

      I am sorry – that IS frustrating! No, you don’t have to be in pain forever and you don’t have to live with your stomach looking pregnant for the rest of your life. We can absolutely rehab your core. Through out program, you can close your diastasis, strengthen your core and relive all that back pain. I’d be happy to answer any questions you have about our programs. Feel free to email us using our contact form: https://thetummyteam.com/about/contact/

  24. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Cami,

    You don’t need elective surgery to fix this! Through rehabbing your core muscles, teaching you posture, alignment and proper body mechanics, your diastasis will close and stay closed. We would love to work with you. Our online programs are very effective. I would love to answer any questions you have about our approach and how it works. Feel free to email me using the contact form on the website: https://thetummyteam.com/about/contact/

  25. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Laurie,

    I am not sure about the weight gain because that’s not our specialty. But the bloating and pain could be due to diastasis. I would recommend doing a self check by following the instructions in the video at the bottom of this page: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/symptoms/diastasis-recti/

  26. roger betts says:

    Hello my name is Roger I am 53 my local GP diagnosed me as having a hiatus hernia and an unbelical hernia and said I didnt need treatment I asked if it was possible to get surgery to correct it and could he refer me to see a cosultant.
    After seeing the consultant yesterday it turns out I have a diastisis recti and he has refered me back to the doctors.
    My symptoms are severe bloating back pains shortness of breath.
    I work as a steel erector which sometimes involves lifting heavy objects in confined spaces.Please tell me what my best opptions are

    Kind Regards

    Roger

  27. Lucy says:

    Hi, I have had 4 kids and have a constant buldging tummy. I started Pilates 2 years ago to specifically target my core. A year into it an instructor helped me realize that I have an seperation. I have been told that it is only completely fixable through surgery to reconnect them. I have been doing transverse exercises for 2 years and I can feel strong lower muscles, but still have such a bulge. I have a lot of neck and lower back pain and I know this has to do with my core. Are you saying that your rehabilitation can cause the abdominal wall to come back together? Because I have heard that is impossible.

  28. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Roger,

    I would recommend doing our Core Foundations Online Course to strengthen the core muscles and learn better lifting techniques that don’t put pressure on your abdominal wall. Diastasis Recti is quite treatable and men tend to respond really quickly to rehab. Here’s a link to our online courses: https://thetummyteam.com/programs/online-core-training/

  29. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Lucy,

    Yes, that’s what we’re saying! Diastasis CAN be rehabilitated without surgery. We’ve been healing this condition in our clinic for years, and we have developed online programs to help those who aren’t close by. I would recommend doing our Core Foundations Online Course: https://thetummyteam.com/programs/online-core-training/

    If you want to know more about our approach, and talk about your specific symptoms, feel free to email us at: info@thetummyteam.com

  30. cynthia KLeven says:

    I have had 5 kids and can put about 4 fingers into the hole left in my belly button area. I work out a lot and now realize I’ve been probably making this worse!! I have had low back pain since my last baby. In fact one x ray showed my sacrum is not very connected anymore. It pops in and out all the time and I cannot lay flat on my back anymore. Can physical therapist help with your program. I just can’t fathom how I could really get my body back together on my own. Most people say I should just get a tummy tuck to sew up the muscles.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Cynthia,

      I am confident we can help you! Our Core Foundations Online Program would be really beneficial in helping rehab your muscles, stabilize your sacrum and close your diastasis. We have found that there is a very systematic process to rehabilitate the core and so it was easy to translate what we do in the clinic into an online program. Plus, when you take the program you aren’t totally on your own. We have an online forum where members can reach out to our PT’s with questions, help with modifications or just needing encouragement. If you feel that you need more than that, we also offer eSessions with our specialists for $100 / session.

  31. cynthia KLeven says:

    I have had 5 kids and can put about 4 fingers into the hole left in my belly button area. I work out a lot and now realize I’ve been probably making this worse!! I have had low back pain since my last baby. In fact one x ray showed my sacrum is not very connected anymore. It pops in and out all the time and I cannot lay flat on my back anymore. Can physical therapist help with your program. I just can’t fathom how I could really get my body back together on my own. Most people say I should just get a tummy tuck to sew up the muscles.

  32. Chandra Pratt says:

    I wish I could afford this. My life has been hell the past month. J finally got a ct scan and said that minimal diastases of the rectus abdominal muscles. I suffer from bloating, dont want to eat because it makes it worse, pain, some nausea. And it is lime this 24/7. I don’t know what else to do. I’m going into a depression because my house is not cleaning itself and I have here wonderful kids that I want to be outside with playing. Please help me

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      I am sorry Chandra. I know what that feels like. Our programs will be on sale in August (25% off). That makes your program only $149 instead of $199. I hope that helps. Our next sale will be around Thanksgiving.

  33. Chandra Pratt says:

    I wish I could afford this. My life has been hell the past month. J finally got a ct scan and said that minimal diastases of the rectus abdominal muscles. I suffer from bloating, dont want to eat because it makes it worse, pain, some nausea. And it is lime this 24/7. I don’t know what else to do. I’m going into a depression because my house is not cleaning itself and I have here wonderful kids that I want to be outside with playing. Please help me

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      I am sorry Chandra. I know what that feels like. Our programs will be on sale in August (25% off). That makes your program only $149 instead of $199. I hope that helps. Our next sale will be around Thanksgiving.

  34. Iikia Poitier says:

    Hi I am at a healthy weight however my stomach is huge. I know part of it is due to the diastasis. It may be possible that I am still carrying belly fat as well. How do I tell the difference? And do yoh guys help your clients lose belly fat while healing the separation?

  35. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Iikia,

    We have a video that walks you through how to to do a self check for diastasis recti at the bottom of this page: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/symptoms/diastasis-recti/

    Our program doesn’t include any nutrition or weight loss portions. We focus on rehabilitating the core and pelvic floor muscles to work for you in daily life so you are pain free.

    Aside from diastasis, it’s important to consider is how you feel. You may not even have diastasis, but if you’re experiencing back pain, hip or pelvic pain, constipation, overall fatigue and weakness, or pelvic floor dysfunction like leaking when you cough or sneeze….then you would benefit from core rehab. Diastasis is a diagnosis – sure. But it’s also a symptom of functional core weakness. And THAT is the bigger picture that needs to be addressed. If your core is not working for you in daily life, we want to help.

  36. Jill says:

    Hello, I have 4 children last 2 c sections, I have a 3 finger gap and a possible small ambilical hernia.
    2 yrs ago I started getting burning pain that felt like it was in my skin in my stomach about 2 inches down from belly button. If I sit wierd or work out I defiantly notice it more .
    Is this a common side effect and will this help?

  37. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Jill,

    Although not everyone with DR experiences that burning feeling you are describing, it is common. The umbilical hernia is usually a result of core weakness and compensating movement strategies – which we do address in our program. We could absolutely help you feel strong and pain free again. I would recommend our Core Foundations online program along with an Abdominal Rehab Splint.

    You can check out our online programs here: https://thetummyteam.com/programs/online-core-training/

    And our splints here: https://thetummyteam.com/splinting/why-splint/

  38. Edie A Maguire says:

    Hi, my name is Edie, I’ve had abdominal problems for the past 3years, i’ve been sick & lost 65lbs. within a 2 year period, from not being able to eat but a very small meal a day, if anything. Than suddenly about 6month ago my belly from below chest down to my pelvic have been descented, & just keeps getting worse. Can hardly eat but a half a roll a day, so im not gaining weight. There’s been so many symptoms along the way, but especially pain on lower left side is most consistent. Back in December 16 I thought I may have prolapse organs,but so far I haven’t been diagnous. I’ve been sick & inside all summer & now my bones & muscles are weakening, do you think this could be diastastsis recta?

  39. Karen Taylor says:

    I have a 15 year old son delivered by ceasearean and was told at the time that my muscles hadn’t knitted together. Over the past couple of months, I have experienced the worst pain – like a tight knot under my ribs. I have had blood tests….clear, and urine tests …also clear. I am waiting for an ultrasound scan to check for gallstones could this be a symptom of diastasis?

  40. Teri says:

    I recently had a robotic assisted hysterectomy that requires filling your abdomen with air. I am overweight with a large belly. 4 months post-op, I still have sharp upper abdominal pain that my doctors say should not be related to the hysterectomy, as it’s in an area that is far away from the incisions. I’ve had a CT scan and it shows an umbilical hernia. Could filling my abdomen with air, when I already had a large belly, cause a hernia and / or Diastasis Recti?? My doctors are unsure if the hernia is what’s causing my pain, because it’s above and to the left of the hernia. I have pain every day. If it is diastasis recti, would it have caused intense, sharp pain that took weeks to lessen in intensity, to moderate every day pain four months later?
    Thank you!

  41. TheTummyTeam says:

    I am so sorry that you are experiencing this. That type of surgery can cause the forward forceful pressure that creates diastasis recti and possibly a hernia, especially when done on a weak and vulnerable core. The pain could be from scar tissue or adhesions forming in that area that are trying to protect you. Muscle guarding (what we do when we tense up do to chronic pain) can actually intensify this type of pain over time. We work with clients with all kinds of abdominal trauma and I do believe we can help you. I recommend you consider doing our 8 week online Core Foundations program so we can help your body heal. You may also consider going through a grief routine I filmed recently for Fit2b Online Studios (https://fit2b.us/grief-routine/). Disconnect due to trauma often creates a distorted pain reaction in our muscles that can be hard to diagnose but is very real to the client. We would love to help you feel better.

  42. Amanda R says:

    I have a 4 year old and 19 month old, I was diagnosed with DR in march of this year my primary doctor was the first one to make the diagnosis due to the fact that I went to his office because I was feeling a lump in my upper abdomen, I was a complete mess thinking the worst possible, I got CT scans and ultrasounds nothing came out of the ordinary, it is now September and I’m still feeling the bulging, swollen, llumpy feeling in my abdomen. It feels as though something is moving around in there and sometimes I feel pain. It’s very scary and sometimes makes me nervous that it may be a tumor or something serious but after reading all these posts I feel more cofindent that it is just the DR and I need to start working on my core. The back pain is getting worse and worse as well. I’m also very petite and carry about 2 big boys a lot! Does all this sound like DR? Normal to feel like your insides are just floating around?

  43. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Amanda,
    Thank you for reaching out. Yes your symptoms are very consistent with diastasis recti and a functionally weak core. We commonly have clients with those lumpy feelings and movement and it is most commonly due to a very weak and thin abdominal wall (stretched out and disconnected) and you are feeling your intestines moving. When the core is not solid and supportive, the intestinal tract tends to bulge and move and you are able to see and feel it. I highly recommend doing our Core Foundations program. We will help you step by step rebuild your core and your back pain will improved and your connection to your core will change dramatically.

  44. Wilka Betances says:

    Hi, reading all this comments makes me think, (I have all those symtoms, my lower back hurst like crazy, my ribs, if I seat or stand quickly it feels like knotted in my belly, when I am laying down I can feel something moving inside my belly, my stomach looks I have tumors… I habe (IBS-D) I also have Endometiosis and cyst on both uterus… my GYN and my Gastrologist said that RD has notting to do with my pain… its all Endometriosis and “IBS”.
    My chiropractor says, its is DR…. I am miserable, I’ve tried therapy, and painful sex… and couple of other things here, I am a bit overweight 150, 5’4 usually my weigh was 130 but my meds was the cause… I also have Lupus and Fibro; yea a full package lol… I am 31yrs old 3 kids… first pregnancy twins boys 6 yrs ago and a almost 4 yrs old boy… I also had a mini abdominoplasty 2 yrs ago and thats when everything began. Never saw a result, my belly same day after the surgery was weird looking like divided in half and lost of bumps and lumps. Two yrs later, worst, I dont have the extra skin…. but it hurts soo much specially my lower and back and my ribs!!! Can i proof to some “Doctors” that the DR is causing me pain!!!

  45. Wilka Betances says:

    Sorry for all the horrible writing, I send it without reading it, I am tired lol, I tried everything…
    * I am also having painful sex*
    But I think that is the endometriosis

  46. TheTummyTeam says:

    Wilka,

    First of all, so sorry for the delayed response. We just put on a medical conference for practitioners to understand more about diastasis treatment, so we’re a bit behind here. Secondly, I am so sorry that you’ve been living this way for so long. And I am sorry you haven’t felt validated. While DR itself rarely causes pain, the *symptoms* that are a direct result from DR definitely are painful to live with. The back pain, the painful sex, the rib pain….it’s all related.

    It sounds like you went into that abdominoplasty with an already compromised abdominal wall and you just couldn’t recover from the trauma. The good news is there is no such thing as too far gone. Despite how long you’ve been suffering and how severe your symptoms seem…I promise we can help you feel better.

    I would recommend our Core Foundations Online Course with an Abdominal Rehab Splint. The course is 8 weeks and will make a world of difference. Given your medical background, I would also highly encourage you to also do at least one eSession with one of our specialists. They are 1-hour virtual appointments where we can address more specific needs and help make your online program more tailored.

  47. Johnny Market says:

    Has anyone ever reported burning/stinging penis as symptom?

  48. TheTummyTeam says:

    Not to my knowledge. That sounds like a different issue you may want to have a doc look into.

  49. Deborah West says:

    I have been diagnosed with diastasis recti and I’m in stage five renal failure with chronic back pain and now vascular disease in legs I’m approx 65 pounds overweight to get a transplant for a new kidney I’m also a a severe diabetic ! I need a miracle to get this weight off I currently weigh 233 lbs have to be 175-180 lbs for surgery! My belly has huge bulge from the diastasis recti also a hyadial hernia behind that! HELP!!!! On Medicare ins

  50. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Deborah,

    I am so sorry for all the suffering.I want to make sure you understand that our program is not a weight loss program, but we can still help you. Though some clients experience a loss in inches around their waist, it is from toning a muscle and we don’t guarantee this outcome. With your surgery coming up, I would recommend our Core Preparations course which is designed to prepare the core for abdominal surgery. It is a streamlined program but will still help the diastasis and the back pain. The important part is that your body needs better support from the internal corset muscles and learning the movement strategies we teach will promote that. I would also recommend an Abdominal Rehab Splint alongside the program. Both will be on sale in November. 😉

  51. Jennifer FINGER says:

    I have a 10 year old and an 11 year old. In the last couple years I noticed when I sneeze or jump I pee I recently developed a lump on my left side and have lower abdominal pain there. My gyno thinks that it is a diastasis recti. I also have a prolapsed rectum and bladder. I also have a very very slightly elevated ca-125 it’s 58. And reading your information it looks like my recti could have caused the bladder and rectum issues but is it normal to have a bulge and achy dull pain on my left side from a diastasis recti? I feel like something else might be going on as well because I don’t see anywhere where it would cause a both on one side and lower abdominal pain. Thanks for any thoughts on the subject

  52. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Jennifer,
    Diastasis is the separation of the connective tissue in the middle of the abdominal muscles. If you have a lump on the side, it could be something else. i would seek another opinion for that specifically, to look into any other factors involved.

    In regards to the diastasis, the prolapse and overall weakness, we can absolutely help you with that. The diastasis didn’t necessarily cause the prolapse issues. Both the prolapse and the diastasis are symptoms of Functional Core Weakness. Diastasis often gets treated like it’s a stand alone diagnosis, but in this case it’s actually a symptom of a much larger picture.

    Our Core Foundations Online Program and an Abdominal Rehab Splint would help improve core connection, reverse your diastasis and reverse your prolapse symptoms. Depending on the severity of your prolapse you might need to do some extra pelvic floor rehab with us, but we can absolutely get you feeling better.

  53. Kira says:

    I have a 12 and a 14 yrs old. My stomach is bigger as compared to rest if my slender body. I have off and on baby kicks like movements in my stomach. I am approaching menopause. Is it Diastacis Rectis? What do I do about it? I have been doing workouts at the gym including for abs muscle flattening but after reading this I am worried . Please guide me.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Kira,

      It sounds like it very well could be diastasis recti. If you want to do a self assessment, we have a video on that here: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/symptoms/diastasis-recti/

      Even if you don’t have diastasis, it sounds like you likely have weak internal core muscles and would benefit from rehab. Our programs and abdominal splints are on sale this week – 30% off.

      I would recommend an Abdominal Rehab Splint along with out Core Foundations 8 Week program. I would be happy to answer any questions you have about our program.

  54. Tracey says:

    I have had a weird feeling of pressure/pulling below my belly button ever since I’ve had kids, both via csection. I feel it more as the day goes on and mostly when I suck in my stomach. Unfortunately I have quite a bit of extra fat in my lower abdomen, have not lost it since having my last child. I am thinking I also have prolapse because the more I am on my feet the more pressure I feel “ down there”. My doctor seems to think it’s muscular but that’s about all the advice I’ve been given.

  55. TheTummyTeam says:

    Tracey,
    Your symptoms are not uncommon in the clients we see. It sounds like you are suffering from a weak internal corset muscle as well as weak pelvic floor muscles. Trust your instincts that something is up…don’t let your doc brush you off. We would love to work with you to get you feeling better and more confident in your body’s ability to do daily things like stand for long periods of time! I would recommend our Core Foundations Online Course.

  56. L. Harrison says:

    Hello! I have been experiencing a number of these symptoms since giving birth to full-term twins seven months ago. Both their birth and their 4-year-old brother were born via csection. It started with excruciating pain during intercourse. The back pain and high, firm/lumpy stomach bump I attributed to my body bouncing back from birthing multiples but it is still extreme and rounded(literally every time I go anywhere, people ask when I’m due). Does this sound like DR? If so, what course would you recommend for strengthening?

  57. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi there,

    It does sound like diastasis, and if not that, you certainly show symptoms of functional core weakness. Usually if someone can say their pain started after having kids, it’s a sign of some kind of dysfunction. I would recommend our Core Foundations Online Program as well as an Abdominal Splint. An eSession w/one of our specialists would help make your rehab even more personal. We are having a sale on 11/27 for Cyber Monday and the programs and eSessions will be 25% off.

  58. Jacqueline Wilches says:

    I have a little bump that keeps popping out in the Center of my upper abdomen. I usually just push it back in by tightening my abdomen and pressing firmly. It reminds me of coagulated blood in a pouch

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Jacqueline,
      It sounds like a possible hernia. If it isn’t causing pain yet, that’s a good sign. We can work with you to repair it as well as strengthen your core and teach you proper body mechanics to prevent this from happening again.

  59. Michelle says:

    My daughter is 6 years old. I am quite overweight, and it is a bit hard for me to get an accurate reading when trying to test myself for DR. However, I’ve had lower back, sciatica and pelvic floor issues since I gave birth, and additionally my belly size changes dramatically from a standing position to a sitting position (everything pushes out like crazy) and I get a weird cone-head shape in the middle of my belly when I do crunches, etc. Does this sound like a possible DR?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Michelle,

      Thank you for reaching out to us, because I am confident we can help you resolve your symptoms. To answer your question, yes that sounds exactly like DR. But the good news is we can fix it with core rehab. Regardless of size and shape, everyone has core muscles that are designed to stabilize their spine, support their organs and assist in daily body mechanics like: bending, reaching, lifting, squatting, etc. In our core rehab, we reconnect you to those muscles, helping you understand how they are designed to be used, and helping you strengthen them to eliminate all the pain and dysfunction you’ve been living with. I would recommend our Core Foundations program and an Abdominal Rehab Splint. We would love to work with you…if you have further questions about our program, please let me know.

  60. Nthabiseng says:

    I am very curious as to whether this might possibly affect the lumbar spine to curve in some way (scoliosis) and cause a pelvic anterior tilt. Thank you for the info!

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      An inactive transverse abdominis can cause the torso to collapse instead of elongate which often accentuates the curve of scolosis. As we strengthen this muscle we see a dramatic change in the scoliosis curve. As for anterior pelvic tilt, what we tend to see is that when clients cannot connect well tho their transverse (with or without a diastasis) they tend to compensate by resting in anterior or post pelvic tilt instead of living in neutral pelvis. A lot of our clients struggle with all kinds of alignment issues until we start them in functional core rehab. It is exciting what is able to change when your core muscles are strong and clients are aware of how to use their bodies properly. Thanks for your question.

  61. Nthabiseng says:

    I am very curious as to whether this might possibly affect the lumbar spine to curve in some way (scoliosis) and cause a pelvic anterior tilt. Thank you for the info!

  62. Helen says:

    Hi I am in the UK I’m 35 and have a prominent tummy when I lay down and lift up I also have little belly button hernia doctor said it’s all cosmetic so doubt NHS would sort it. I have to kids I put 7 stone on with my eldest 18 years ago then lost a lot of weight afterwards, then I had my now 9 year old and the doctors thought I could of had SPD but never clarified it but was in a lot of pain in end of pregnancy. Iv recently started losing weight over the last year through stress and family bereavement and my divorce and my apron tummy is very saggy and I’m small everywhere else and my upper abdomen is constantly sticking out and under my belly button is apron and uncomfortable, I can feel gap in the middle and also I see an oesteopath as I have pelvic torsion, rotated sacroiliac joints , sciatica, muscle pain all down thighs and round my sides of tummy and when walk I get this pulling sensation in the apron tummy, I am a bit constipated periods are heavy ish on first day and get bloated a bit , also I feel like I have a slight prolapse, and dread eating as I can feel it moving about at times

  63. Gene Zulauf says:

    I’ve had a bad sinus infection which went down into my lungs, after several session of anti bio I was coughing up heavy discharge and coughing extremely hard, my stomach became enlarged by two pant sizes. While coughing a day later my my stomach enlarged and belly button came out of place,after a few moments I was able to push into place the pain was great my doctor was called and she set up an appointment for two weeks later. Today not only my stomach is pain full and swollen. But I have developed a pain on the lower right side up toward my lower shoulder blade.Any help would be great.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi there,
      I am so sorry for you. It really sounds like your core is pretty inactive and coughing likely caused a lot of forceful forward pressure contributing to it distending and possibly creating or exaggerating a diastasis and possibly an umbilical hernia. I think you should definitely start with your doctor and make sure there is nothing really serious happening. The distended tummy, bulging when coughing, the belly button and some of the shoulder blade pain can all be related to functional core weakness and poor coordination of your internal core muscles. If you doctor rules out any emergency medical needs, I would highly recommend our 8 week Core Foundations online course. We work on the way your body functionally needs to use the core muscles and I think it could be very helpful for you.

  64. Margaret says:

    Hi
    I recently got my ultrasound results that showed I had a diastasis recti 6cm opening.

    My experience..
    What lead me to the ultrasound was bloating after a meal, causing pressure to push up making it feel weird under my rib cage causing pressure, pressure in my belly after standing long periods, pressure when bending over. I got scared I thought oh dear I have a hernia. So I was referred to physio, I was told my opening was only less than 2 fingers, there was no hernia I was worried for nothing, I felt brushed off. I went back to ER and repeated the same complaints
    and was ordered an ultrasound that showed my 6cm gap I was wowed. I’m also 5’6 190lbs which would explain my weak abdominal wall. I’ve been doing some exercises walking on the treadmill and lots of research about diastasis recti. In my nursing career I’ve never heard of this condition. I am currently on modified, but I have yet to have a MRI to confirm a hernia. There’s this firmer part just above my belly button, non painful it feels like 1.5-2 inch diameter…according to the 3 docs I’ve seen it’s not a hernia….my question is…has anyone experienced anything like this and what type of program do you recommend? Should I continue modified due to my line of work and if the gap is 6cm. It just seems the general practitioner docs here are not as informed about DR, and it worries me I won’t get better and I might not get the time to heal and end up with a even bigger mess. The tummy team is far the best I’ve read. I’ve ordered a splinter I cannot wait for it to arrive. I wish everyone the best on your healing journey.

    • Veronica says:

      Hello – yours sounds just like mine! I have had this bulge above my belly button for about a year now. This past summer I began a 6 month journey toward a gastric sleeve surgery which I will finally get right after Christmas. My surgeon and I both assumed I had a hernia and he had told me if I had one, he would repair it at the same time as my sleeve surgery. So he didn’t seem overly concerned. Well, I just had an abdominal CT scan done first week of December and it showed no hernia at all, just diverticulitis and this diastasis recti. I didnt ask how large it is but he told me to follow up with my PCP. I had suspected I had this after my son was born 2 years ago so I had googled it lol! All I know from experience with it all this time is that it causes back pain, and sometimes after meals I get very bloated (usually carbs do it), rolling over on my side to get up from bed helps put less strain on it – if I get up like I’m doing a sit-up, it really bulges out like a cone and I feel the stretching. I have seen websites and blogs that advertise exercise programs specifically for diastasis, but I haven’t purchased any yet – I may now, now that I definitely know I have diastasis. But for now, I can tell you avoid stretching your abs, be careful getting up from bed, no crunches, and as a side-sleeper it helps me to hug a long pillow and place part of it under my stomach like I did when I was pregnant. I am also looking online currently for one of those abdominal binders to wear under my clothes for extra support. I’d love to follow up with you since this is new to both of us! I am on facebook under Veronica Hernandez Lopez if you’d like to friend me!

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Veronica,

      Thanks for your comment. We would love to work with you too. Our online programs are comprehensive, easy to follow and gentle. As a side note, I am sorry you have to live with Diverticulitis. I have a friend with Chron’s disease and it can be difficult to live with. You have my sympathies.

  65. TheTummyTeam says:

    Thank you so much for your message. It really sounds like your belly has been through a lot and so many of your symptoms are consistent with not just diastasis recti but the functional core weakness that always associated with it. Our Core Foundations online program would likely be very beneficial to you as we address all of the things your are concerned about. Extra skin and belly fat are not all that is going on. We address the underlying strength issue that is contributing to you pain and instability. We would love to help you systematically rebuild your body from the inside.

  66. Margaret says:

    Hi veronica
    Thank you for the reply. So I seen the surgeon today, when he was examining me while I was standing up he can feel the hardness I was referring to, but when I payed down and did the diastasis test to see if there was a bulge, he couldn’t find it, so now I am waiting for an MRI since the ultrasound and surgeon wasn’t able to officially diagnose a hernia. I’m praying it’s not a hernia but I’m not sure if I should start a program with the tummy team. I am not sure what to do, because the surgeon advised me to stop all exercise but I’m not sure if he’s up to date on diastasis and the special exercises for it. So I’m lost. I haven’t received my splint yet on the mail either. I was hoping it’d be in the mail today so it can help me decide on when to start a program. I’ll keep everyone posted. But did you feel pressure in you abdomen as well like from longstanding or when you used your belly muscles. I stopped using my belly muscles I started to bring my belly to spine, and when i get out of bed it’s usually my side and I’m a side sleeper as well.

  67. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Margaret,

    Unfortunately, Diastasis recti is widely undiagnosed and most medical professionals are unaware of the effective treatment options. Your symptoms are very common to what we see with our clients and I am confident that we can help you. I suspect the postures you are in for nursing may be contributing to the symptoms you are experiencing and how your body is bracing. We work on that too. I would recommend our Core Foundations 8 week online program and an abdominal rehab splint to start. We take you step by step through the rehab process with a ton of education along the way that will be very empowering for you. You may want to do an eSession as well if you feel like some 1:1 instruction or modifications may be helpful but I would start the program first as it is very comprehensive.

  68. Becky says:

    Hi, I have been reading all of these comments and can relate to so much of it. I believe I also have DR. My stomach muscles feel very tight and sore most of the time. Standing for long periods of time is absolutely exhausting for those muscles, I have a lot of lower back pain, and I feel horribly stuffed after eating the smallest amounts of food or drinking anything. I thought I had a pulled muscle or strained muscle that I just kept re-injuring because it would be a little bit better and then get worse and now it’s really not good after having made some poor choices in picking up my 46 pound kindergartner. I am only 5’2” and 105 pounds. The twist to all of this is that I have been a Pilates instructor teaching class once a week for the past nine years. It would certainly seem as though my muscles in the core should be stronger than the average person and I still think that maybe they were/are. But, the strain of a few things that happened with my kiddo might have been enough to upset everything. I have been to the doctor and we have ruled all kinds of things out except for hernia. I have nothing visible protruding so it doesn’t seem like it could be any type of hernia except maybe a ventral hernia. I forgot to mention I also have difficulty breathing when these muscles are taxed in any way. I am extremely healthy otherwise with the exception of some hormonal imbalance stuff that I will be addressing next month with a natural health clinic in my area. I am 42 years old. I’m glad I found the tummy team and I think you might be the answer to my trouble. I would love any input you have. I absolutely do not want to have surgery if I don’t have to. I meet with a surgeon on January 7 to determine what next to see if it is a hernia. Maybe between now and then I can be enough better that I can cancel that appointment. I have stopped teaching Pilates until we have this straightened out but I really miss it and I miss exercising. Again, any advice you can give with a little bit of information I’ve shared would be much appreciated. Thank you so much!

  69. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Becky,

    Your story is so familiar to us and I am confident we can help you and hopefully keep you from needing surgery. I would highly recommend starting our Core Foundations 8 week Online program and possibly postponing your surgical consult to give your body some time to respond to the rehab. So many of your symptoms do point to functional core weakness and diastasis recti. Spend some time on our website, I think it can answer a lot of questions and I believe Core Foundations will be so helpful for you.

  70. J. W. Huey says:

    Here`s a new one, or at least an unusual one for you. I am a 79(!) year old male diagnosed with diastasis recti some twenty years ago; was told it was “nothing serious” albeit a bit unusual in a male. I weigh 220 and am 5`11″ (having shrunk from 6’2″).

    Lately, in spite of having lost about twenty pounds over the last year or so my gut has increased in size sufficiently to make it impossible to cinch up my kilt. Kilts are worn a good deal higher than trousers; thus my recent thicker middle makes mearing my kilt impossible. Good thing this is not my usual attire.

    I am having virtually every back issue you mention; low back issues, sciatica, etc.

    At my advanced age, is there anything I can do about this short of some sort of industrial strength girdle?

    Many thanks,

    J. W. “Pete” Huey III

  71. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi There,

    Diastasis Recti (DR) in males is more common than you might think. We treat quite a few males in the clinic and online for DR and chronic pain. And even at your age, we can still help. Check out this story: https://thetummyteam.com/diastasis-recti-men/

    I would recommend our Core Foundations 8-Week Online Program, an Abdominal Rehab Splint (which is quite different than a girdle) and perhaps an eSession if you feel you need more 1-on-1 guidance. Our programs will be on sale on Jan. 22nd.

  72. Margaret says:

    Hi just to update those who are following, I did go for my MRI on Friday and got my results back this evening, I went to ER to get them reviewed. And it turns out that I have “very tiny abdominal hernia” that’s exactly what it says on my report, along with non serious other things like liver spleen normal, no gallstones, so now I gotta follow up with a surgeon to see what the next plan is. If I’ll need an operation or what, but since I’ve started wearing this abdominal splint I lost 2 inches around my waist and most of the symptoms subsided, but there are a few that I still experience. Like with my line of work nursing I can feel pressure in my abdomen from being on my feet for log periods, or when lifting I can feel pressure above my belly button sometimes despite in drawing my abdomen to spine. So now I gotta think of all the questions in the world to ask the surgeon my next appointment. I also made a promise to myself i am going to educate my patients on diastasis recti, as I have been since I’ve started experiencing all of this stuff. I’ve done so much research, never have I read so much information on DR. I am so thankful for everyone who has shared their personal experiences on the matter. Any updates on those who posted?

  73. Margaret says:

    Hi again tummy team! Being that I have a very tiny umbilical abdominal hernia what training do you recommend for that?
    Thanks
    Margaret

  74. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Margaret,

    A small umbilical hernia is a common symptom in our clients. We can treat it with core rehabilitation. In most cases, what is diagnosed as a hernia is actually a diastasis – a stretching but not a tear. We have a great educational video that helps clear that up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUT8UZP_NP4&t=7s&list=PLWriqPZx5Up8c02y7h4IR5iYgPXvbRvU8&index=9

    Our Core Foundations Course would be excellent at helping you rehab the core, which would improve the hernia and give you tools to prevent it from happening again. The course is on sale TODAY! If you aren’t ready to start, you can use the “Start Later” option.

  75. Mandi Martersteck says:

    I’ve had low back pain since having my 2nd child 6 yrs ago. I’ve had 2 MRIs, had injections in a few places in my back that didn’t help or made it worse, have had dry needling which has helped with the spasms, physical therapy, and have lost LOTS of sleep. We have yet to find the cause! I’m now 38 and had one more baby 2 Year’s ago. While at a physical therapy appt for my back pain last year they discovered I have diastasis Recti at 3 1/2 fingers. There was a bit of a lightbulb moment. “Is this the cause of my back pain?” Sounds like it could be. A year after my last baby was born I noticed my belly was starting to stick out more. I’m 5’2” 112 lbs. I exercise regularly. I was surprised my belly was gaining inches. Now I know why…D.R. My question is, could exercises still get rid of it at this point? I haven’t had success with the appropriate exercises yet but I haven’t had the opportunity to be super consistent. I was told not to use my rectus abs at all but it seems impossible to not use them in daily living. If exercises didn’t work, would surgery help me. I DON’T WANT to deal with a surgery but I’m exhausted and fed up with my back pain. My posture also seems different like it has changed over the last 2 years. Would surgery (putting the rect. abdom. muscles back in place) allow everything to work properly again? And hopefully get rid of my back pain? I live in Northern Utah. (My pain is low back, right sided SI pain, pain to the right of my sacrum and tail bone, severe muscle spasms in mid back, low back, and upper glutes, as well as external rotators)

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Mandi,
      You are right in that your back pain and protruding tummy is likely being caused by the diastasis. I am glad you had that “ah-ha” moment and contacted us because we can absolutely help you close the DR and relieve all that pain. Surgery really isn’t the answer so I am glad you are wanting to avoid that.

      Traditional ab exercises won’t heal your DR, and in fact can make it worse. You can read more about that here: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/tummy-safe-fitness/

      Our physical therapy is not traditional PT, and is designed to integrate throughout your day – so it’s easy to be consistent and therefore successful. We systematically teach you how to adjust your posture and alignment, strengthen your core, and re-teach you proper body mechanics so you aren’t putting continual pressure on your abdominal wall leading to another diastasis. If you would like to talk more about our program, feel free to leave another comment or email me at: grace@thetummyteam.com

  76. Mandi Martersteck says:

    I’ve had low back pain since having my 2nd child 6 yrs ago. I’ve had 2 MRIs, had injections in a few places in my back that didn’t help or made it worse, have had dry needling which has helped with the spasms, physical therapy, and have lost LOTS of sleep. We have yet to find the cause! I’m now 38 and had one more baby 2 Year’s ago. While at a physical therapy appt for my back pain last year they discovered I have diastasis Recti at 3 1/2 fingers. There was a bit of a lightbulb moment. “Is this the cause of my back pain?” Sounds like it could be. A year after my last baby was born I noticed my belly was starting to stick out more. I’m 5’2” 112 lbs. I exercise regularly. I was surprised my belly was gaining inches. Now I know why…D.R. My question is, could exercises still get rid of it at this point? I haven’t had success with the appropriate exercises yet but I haven’t had the opportunity to be super consistent. I was told not to use my rectus abs at all but it seems impossible to not use them in daily living. If exercises didn’t work, would surgery help me. I DON’T WANT to deal with a surgery but I’m exhausted and fed up with my back pain. My posture also seems different like it has changed over the last 2 years. Would surgery (putting the rect. abdom. muscles back in place) allow everything to work properly again? And hopefully get rid of my back pain? I live in Northern Utah. (My pain is low back, right sided SI pain, pain to the right of my sacrum and tail bone, severe muscle spasms in mid back, low back, and upper glutes, as well as external rotators)

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Mandi,
      You are right in that your back pain and protruding tummy is likely being caused by the diastasis. I am glad you had that “ah-ha” moment and contacted us because we can absolutely help you close the DR and relieve all that pain. Surgery really isn’t the answer so I am glad you are wanting to avoid that.

      Traditional ab exercises won’t heal your DR, and in fact can make it worse. You can read more about that here: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/tummy-safe-fitness/

      Our physical therapy is not traditional PT, and is designed to integrate throughout your day – so it’s easy to be consistent and therefore successful. We systematically teach you how to adjust your posture and alignment, strengthen your core, and re-teach you proper body mechanics so you aren’t putting continual pressure on your abdominal wall leading to another diastasis. If you would like to talk more about our program, feel free to leave another comment or email me at: grace@thetummyteam.com

  77. Jennifer Wood says:

    Hello. I was wondering if a DR would be confused with an ulcer. I have had the same painful spot (tender to touch) about 2 inches or less to the right (my right) and slightly above my belly button since I was in my 20’s (I’m 45 now). Doctors brushed it off as an ulcer. It has consistently been the same for years. I went to a naturopathic doctor this week, and he was pressing on that spot. He said it felt a bit like a DR, which I have never heard of before. I am not overweight, nor do I have a bulge. I do notice that I cannot do planks or situps because my stomach will pop out considerably, which I always thought was odd. I have a constant issue with feeling like I pull side and back muscles when I exercise at all or lift things. When I sit for long periods of time, I get a stitch in my right side. My back muscles are weak, and I have had low back pain for years. I go yo a chiropractor once a month, and feel relief for about a week before the back pain starts again. Does this sound like DR, by the symptoms I am having?

    • Kristy says:

      I have the same issue! Only 2 years in though, and its 2 inches above and to my *left* sometimes. OB brushed it off as an ulcer bc I had Just had twins but it went away when I got pregnant again and my belly started swellling, yet 3 days after baby is born it’s back! This doc thought it might be a hernia and yet hhe ultrasound found nothing. Can it be DR? My belly shrunk back quite well actually after the twins, now of course it’s still out but I’m only 6 weeks postpartum

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Kristy:
      I don’t really think ulcer pains are the same as abdominal adhesions or stretching type pains but some physicians may not know what to call indescript abdominal pains. Core rehabilitation helps your body to reconnect and balance out any of those muscle imbalances that occur with pregnancy. I am not sure why pregnancy improved the pain but I have been impressed by how many seemingly random aches and pains get resolved when we restore your core to its optimal functional strength.

  78. Jennifer Wood says:

    Hello. I was wondering if a DR would be confused with an ulcer. I have had the same painful spot (tender to touch) about 2 inches or less to the right (my right) and slightly above my belly button since I was in my 20’s (I’m 45 now). Doctors brushed it off as an ulcer. It has consistently been the same for years. I went to a naturopathic doctor this week, and he was pressing on that spot. He said it felt a bit like a DR, which I have never heard of before. I am not overweight, nor do I have a bulge. I do notice that I cannot do planks or situps because my stomach will pop out considerably, which I always thought was odd. I have a constant issue with feeling like I pull side and back muscles when I exercise at all or lift things. When I sit for long periods of time, I get a stitch in my right side. My back muscles are weak, and I have had low back pain for years. I go yo a chiropractor once a month, and feel relief for about a week before the back pain starts again. Does this sound like DR, by the symptoms I am having?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Jennifer:

      Ulcers can cause intermittent stomach pains but that would be the only similarity. If the doctor did not have awareness of DR he may not have known to look for it. Your other symptoms definitely correlate with functional core weakness. If you core has been weak for years, it is absolutely possible that you have developed a compensation pattern that pushes out on some of the weaker areas in your abdominal wall. This could contribute to that pain you experience.

      I would recommend you do our Core Foundations program along with Abdominal Rehab Splinting. You don’t actually have to have a diastasis to greatly benefit from the program. All of the other symptoms you’re experiencing would greatly improve with a better connection and functional use of your internal course of muscle.

  79. Paul Taylor says:

    Can Diastasis Recti be a work related injury?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hey Paul,

      It’s more likely that you were in chronic positions that were putting intra-abdominal pressure against your abdominal wall, slowly weakening the tissue. Slouching, bending over while rounding the back, crunches or sit-ups, or lifting and moving things in the wrong posture will all continually weaken the tissue until it becomes stretched out (which is what diastasis recti is – a stretched linea alba). What do you do for a living?

  80. Kay Kathleen says:

    Hi there! Hoping you might be able to provide me with a little clarity! Ever since my third child was born nearly 3 years ago, I have been having a great deal of trouble with physical injuries. I’ve been a runner most of my life and was eager to get back at it, but I was quickly sidelined with a back injury to my lower right region of the back. I also have a couple of bulging discs and ligament stenosis.
    Last year, when I went to pick my son up out of the crib, I felt almost like a ripping sensation go right down my left abdominal muscle from around my belly button to my pubic bone. I quickly put him down and soon recovered, but was left with a very tiny umbilical hernia and tenderness in my abdominal muscle that still has not gone away.
    I had an ultrasound done of the area which showed no hernia, which is great, but the drs disagree upon their own examination. I went to my gyn who said that I definitely have Diastasis Recti. It is not very large, which is also great.
    I’m just wondering, can this tenderness and sometimes burning-sensation be caused by the Diastasis Recti? (It Begins about one inch above my belly button and to my left and runs about one inch below)

    And, if so, what do you recommend from here? I am a very active person, but feel that this has been a bit of an obstacle at times.
    Thanks!

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Kay,

      I’m so sorry you’ve been dealing with these problems for 3 years. If the tenderness is not from a hernia, which it sounds like was ruled out, then it’s from micro tears down the connective tissue (linea alba) between your abdominals muscles. It comes from repetitive forward forceful pressure against the abdominal wall.
      If your core was just too weak after baby #3, your running posture was likely putting pressure against your core with every step. Combine that with all the postures moms are in everyday (all the bending over, lifting, sitting to nurse, carrying heavy car seats, etc) and it was just too much pressure on your weak core.
      The good news is we can help! We can help repair the connective tissue, close the diastasis, and help you gain core strength. Our focus is on helping you get the postural core strength you need for functioning in life. So we will work on posture retraining, releasing tight muscles and addressing compensation patters, and neutral pelvis training. And we’ll do it ways that are meaningful to your life. We’ll use your lifestyle as part of the exercises: picking up the kids, sitting posture, pushing a grocery cart, etc. All of that requires core strength and so we can use all of that to rehab your core.
      I’d recommend Abdominal Rehab Splinting among with our Core Foundations 8 Week Online Program.

    • Kay Kathleen says:

      I am uncertain whether the you will see my update here, Tammy Team, but I wanted to try. I just went back to my doctor about my abdomen, and she said that while I do not have a hernia in my abdominal muscle, the abdominal wall has thinned and is on the cusp of a hernia. She suggested doing core strengthening, so I am returning to you to just double check that, with this new knowledge , the program and splinting you had recommended is still the recommendation (if that made sense!). Thanks so much for all of your help!

  81. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hey Kay,
    Yes, we would absolutely still recommend the same thing: Core Foundations and Abdominal Splinting. And I’d recommend you do it soon because if your tissue is that thin, you really don’t want to develop a hernia that could put your organs at risk for strangulation and require surgery to fix. You can use our instructions here to determine the best fitting splint: https://thetummyteam.com/splinting/fit-use/

  82. Emma says:

    Hello! I have just stumbled on your page and wondered if this is my issue!!!

    Almost 3 years ago I carried twins. They weighed in at 5.1 ibsand 6.2 ibs(full term). At my 6 week check the locum doctor suggested I had Diastasis Recti. However I have undergone 18 months of physio (mainly acupuncture and pilates), a nerve block through my coccyx, placed on Naproxen, gabapentin and high doses of codeine – I’m awaiting further injections directly in my lower back discs.

    During this time it has given little or no relief to sciatica and lower back, hip and pelvic pain (which feels like I’m wearing a belt of pain).

    I have gone from a fully active 30 (something!!), working two nights a week, doing hit work outs, pole dancing, legs bums and tums to hardly being able to get on the floor with my children.

    I have suggested again that it could be Diastasis Recti (as the doctor previously told me) and I keep getting “we will try this first”. It has impacted my life in so many ways! My children don’t get the best of me, my husband and I are not as close as we want to be (!!), I don’t socialise as much as high heels are a killer! But I have all the symptoms; yet I feel like no one wants to say it or wants to help me! I’m out of ideas – and completely out of my head on this medication, any advice will truly be a blessing!

    Thank you in advance

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Emma,

      I am so sorry to hear about all the pain you’ve been in, and the life you are missing out on. Given the nerve block, it’s possible there is more going on, but I do think healing your diastasis and learning to integrate core strength into your daily routine will make a huge impact on your daily pain and fatigue. And because posture plays such a large role in diastasis, the improved posture could also improve the nerve issues.
      We’d love to work with you. I would recommend an Abdominal Splint along with the Core Foundations course. We’re having a sale in May for Mother’s Day if you wanted to hold out.

  83. Carol says:

    I was recently diagnosed – my “baby” is 36, so am doubtful about pregnancy being the only cause out there! lol. I am obese (I hate that word) tho, and am not active, at all. My heaviest lifting is groceries, laundry, and picking a laptop, on tray stand, off the floor from a sitting position. I also seem to have a delicate tummy – or something, as I get nauseous and vomit…gosh it seems like quarterly, but more than once a year – could that be a cause? I also have stress incontinence and hopefully will be starting therapy for that in the next 4-6 weeks. Welcome any thoughts and ideas.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Carol,
      While an active lifestyle in general is healthy, it’s not what we’re focused on. All those things you mentioned – the groceries, the laundry, the laptop – those are the kinds of every day things we use to rehab your core. This isn’t a fitness program – our focus is functional core rehabilitation. I am not sure about the vomiting, but digestive issues can often be the result of a weak core that isn’t supporting the digestive track properly. We can help with the incontinence too. We’d love to work with you. I would recommend an Abdominal Rehab Splint along with Core Foundations. Both will be 25% off May 7-18 for our Mother’s Day Sale.

  84. Carol says:

    I say obese – for clarity – 6 foot female, 26 pounds

  85. Carol says:

    LOL – 260 pounds

  86. JM says:

    I recently had a CT scan, due to pelvic pain. It showed “Rectus muscle diastasis with anterior peritoneal bulging, but no true hernia.” My doctor gave me a referral to a urologist, but didn’t mention doing anything about the diastasis. I’ve been searching for what this is, and how to correct it… when I found your website. 🙂 My question is… will a Abdominal Rehab Splint along with Core Foundations also help the anterior peritoneal bulging? And, is this a common problem that accompanies the rectus muscle diastasis? (I have intestinal angioedema which causes extreme swelling of the intestines at times. I wonder if that has contributed to these issues.)

  87. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi JM,
    “Anterior peritoneal bulging” is doctor speak for chronic forward forceful pressure against the abdominal wall, pushing the organs forward. This is essentially what creates a diastasis. And when a diastasis is present the body uses bracing or breath holding for stability – adding to the pressure. Intestinal bloating can contribute to this movement strategy as well. I would absolutely recommend functional core rehab and I believe you would do well with splinting and Core Foundations. We look forward to helping you!

  88. Chay says:

    I’m 7 weeks postpartum. Delivered twins vaginally. They were big babies. I recovered nicely and quickly and was feeling ready to do some ab exercises. I had a bit of tension in my pelvic area but I pulled through anyways. But that seemed to have to been a mistake. I’m in tremendous pain in the entire mid section of my body. Constipated as well. Feel very weak in that area. Is that due to a diastasis recti? Is it safe to do diastasis exercises even when I’m feeling sore?

  89. TheTummyTeam says:

    Congratulations on those babies! There could be a lot of reasons for that soreness. Pregnancy and then a vaginal delivery of twins is quite challenging on your core and pelvic floor. Even though the first 8 weeks or so we recommend mostly to birth recovery, the parenting demands of newborns are likely exhausting already vulnerable muscles. Our approach is very gentle and focuses first on the postural and respiratory demands of your core. You body will likely feel better with the initial alignment and breathing connections education we offer. Also being aware of your parenting postures. I know this is extra challenging with twins but so important to supporting your body well and setting up your alignment so your core (and Diastasis) can heal. I would highly recommend splinting right now and then our Core Foundations online program. Programs and splints will be on sale for Mother’s Day.

  90. sy says:

    I was diagnosed with fibroids years ago and have had 2 sets removed following the birth of my 2 children. It is my hope that the fibroids will begin to shrink now that I’m over 40. I am also very overweight now and I have back pain increasingly more. Would uterine fibroids have to be removed before the program you are indicating could offer any improvements?

  91. Pallavi says:

    I had my normal delivery 4
    months ago…..I am perfectly fine and had none of the symptoms of diastasis recti but my tummy looks like 4 months pregnant. Could it be a diastasis recti?

  92. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi there,

    It’s quite possible that it is, but I would do a self assessment to be sure. Here is a link to a video on how to assess yourself for diastasis recti: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slz1xD_fREE&index=4&list=PLWriqPZx5Up8c02y7h4IR5iYgPXvbRvU8

    Although you don’t have other symptoms listed here, if gone untreated, it’s only a matter of time before more symptoms present.

  93. TheTummyTeam says:

    Sorry we missed your comment. To follow up, we work with a lot of clients who have or have had fibroids. No you do not have to have them removed to start rehabilitating your core. Depending on the size of the tumors though, they may make it difficult to fully engage your core as effectively as you will be able to after they have shrunk. This is typically only the case for very large tumors though. Also, our core rehab is so helpful to strengthen your core before any surgical procedures helping you have a far better recovery. We would love to work with you. I would recommend Core Foundations for you.

  94. Erin says:

    I just had my 4th baby and c section in March 2018. I have had 3 large (between 9.5-11 lbs) babies in the last 4 years. I have a 5 finger gap with an umbilical hernia. I’m suffering from back pain, uncomfortable intercourse and a belly that appears like I’m 6 months pregnant. I feel very uncomfortable in public and my self esteem is really taking a hit. I was going through PT but then insurance refused to pay. But now I am being told that PT won’t help because the linea alba is too far stretched. I need surgery and a tummy tuck basically and insurance won’t cover it. Is this really the only option? Help!

  95. TheTummyTeam says:

    Erin! Surgery is NOT the only option. We have been treating diastasis with even 10 finger gaps for years. The body is absolutely capable of healing when put in the right circumstances. We suggest not pursuing surgery because it does not actually address the reason for the diastasis in the first place – posture and movements that put pressure against the abdominal wall. Over time, when you return to your lifestyle, you risk re-injuring the area. If AFTER your core is rehabilitated, you still want to pursue surgery for lose skin or other cosmetic reasons, we totally support you in the endeavor and help prepare you for the surgery. But we highly suggest healing the core FIRST for the best possible outcome.

    Our online core rehab programs are very comprehensive and effective. And they come with access to our private client forum where you can reach out to our specialists with questions or even just some encouragement. We also offer eSessions (virtual appointments) to give you an even more personalized rehab experience.

    Given that your diastasis is so severe, I would definitely recommend an eSession if you can afford it. I would recommend our Core Foundations 8 Week Program along with an Abdominal Rehab Splint to aide in the rehab process. You can read more about why we splint here: https://thetummyteam.com/splinting/why-splint/

    If you are interested in purchasing an eSession with your program, I’d like to offer you a bundle discount. Please email me at Grace@TheTummyTeam.com

  96. Sara says:

    I had my third child 1 and a half year ago. I currently have a six finger abdominal separation and an umbilical hernia. I was also told that surgery is my only option by both doctors and PTs. I am planning on having the surgery to fix the hernia soon and was planning on correcting the diastesis recti at the same time. My back has been hurting a lot lately and my pelvic floor is weakening everyday. Will your online program really help me? I’ve tried other online abdominal separation courses and nothing has helped.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Sara,
      Sorry for the delayed response here. Surgery is not the only option, and may not even be the best option. Unfortunately many clients we see who had previous surgery to correct diastasis find themselves in the same situation because they didn’t correct the postural issues that lead to the diastasis in the first place. So now, they’ve reinjured the area only this time it’s harder to heal because of the mesh implanted, the scar tissue, or the general trauma from the surgery.
      As far as umbilical hernias go, cosmetically speaking they technically do usually require surgery to fix, but it’s not necessary. Core rehab can improve the site to the point where it’s not painful or bothersome in any way. If you do choose to pursue surgery for either of these diagnoses, we will support you along the way. We recommend doing our Core Foundations program first to see what you can improve through core rehab and then reassess whether you want to pursue surgery. If you do decide to pursue, then we can also give you some extra support to make it as successful as possible. We’d love to work with you to help you feel better.

  97. Corina Brown says:

    Hi, I have a 6 finger separation..

    When a poo enters my colon it hurts like nothing else. I can’t stand or lay down and it hurts to sit on the toilet until it comes out.

    Is this typical? I also have 3 slipped disks in my lower back..

  98. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Corina,

    It’s hard to know for certain what’s going on, obviously. But in general, constipation and other similar digestion issues can often be greatly improved, if not resolved, through core rehabilitation. When the internal core muscles are weak and deflated, they aren’t putting the pressure needed against the digestive tract to keep things moving. When we can increase connection and strength in the core, and adjust your posture, digestion improves greatly. And since you are likely also experiencing chronic back pain, core rehab would help greatly with that as well. I’d recommend our Core Foundations Online Course along with an Abdominal Rehab Splint to improve these symptoms.

  99. Megan says:

    Hello!
    I stumbled across your artical and had a question. So my diastasis recti got better (no more “tummy coning” yay!). I noticed the other day that my core felt more tight and my separation is now very small compared to what it was. I thank my job and the people I work with for it (I’m an LMT and work with other LMTs and personal trainers).

    But since it’s recrified itself, I’ve had a lot of hip/ pelvic floor issues. The pain is pretty bad and are affecting my job. I’m trying to go to a doctor within the week to rule out any other issues but I wanted to know if this may be related to my care muscles getting better and throwing off my “usual” balance.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Megan,

      In our programs, we address and trouble shoot common problems that people may have when addressing their core. One very common thing we have noticed is overcompensation of other muscles if a core program is just focused on exercises, resulting in other problems such as pelvic floor issues. It is important to be able to apply basic concepts of alignment and core strengthening to how your body is functioning all day with your daily activities to prevent such problems. There is a possibility that your symptoms are related but it is wise to get a medical opinion to rule out any other serious issues.

  100. Lindsey says:

    Hello! I had my daughter 15 months ago via c-section and without any diastasis recti (to my knowledge). However in the last month I’ve developed severe low back pain and I wonder if perhaps I had a case that went undiagnosed? Is it possible to notice symptoms this far from pregnancy/delivery?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Lindsey,
      The interesting thing about DR is that it’s both a diagnosis and a symptom. It’s a symptom of a much larger picture – what we call Functional Core Weakness (FCW). So it’s possible to have a ton of symptoms that sound like they are DR, when in fact you may not have an actual gap, but instead you have FCW. Here is a link to a visual that helps you see how the symptoms overlap: https://thetummyteam.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Symptoms-Infographic.png

      If you would like to do a self-DR Check, here is a link to our page on diastasis that has a video showing you how to check yourself: https://thetummyteam.com/core-rehab/symptoms/diastasis-recti/

      All that being said, you may or may not have DR, but what we *do* know is that you are in pain from some form of core weakness, and we know how to help with that. I would recommend an Abdominal Rehab Splint along with our Core Foundations Online Program.

  101. vibha says:

    I have diastasis recti. I am look like a pregnant not sure because of what? my upper abs are hard.

  102. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi Vibha,
    When you have a diastasis, the line down the center of your abdominal wall is stretched. When this happens, the internal organs are unsupported and gravity sets in, causing everything to bulge out against the abdominal wall giving you that “pregnant” look. There are actually 3 layers of muscle in the abdominal wall – the “6 pack” abs, the obliques, and then the innermost muscle, the transverse abdominis. It’s possible to have strong “outer” muscles of the core, but deflated and weak internal core muscles. What we do in rehab is help you reconnect and strengthen that internal muscle to bring balance and stability. We’ll help you strengthen the muscle and address possible postures and movements that are contributing to the problem. Then we teach you how to integrate use of that internal core muscle in everyday movements like sitting, standing, bending, reaching, lifting, etc. so that everything you do is actually “working your core.” We’d love to work with you. I’d recommend our Core Foundations Online Rehab Program.

  103. Candace Peterson says:

    You make a world of sense for yet another problem doctors would rather not address.
    My husband has a connective tissue disorder. He has had two failed fusions on an acute lordosis that should never have been corrected L-5 to S-1. His slip varies from a 1-2 to a 3-4 so there is very little stability. Spondylitis, spondylosthesis, scoliosis, all vocabulary that we need to consider. He has not been able to eat solids since Memorial Day week end. (Lost 25 pounds since). He has mild Pectis Carinatum, and has seen a protruberance between his ribs with applied pressure for a few years. Now they want to cut up his intestines since they have “quit working.” We can watch the small bowel as it fills and swells upper left, travels to the transition point lower right and disappear. His belly button is an entirely different beast now, all in one month. Core exercise has made him lose his leg strength 100% in the past.

  104. Rachael Alexander says:

    Hi. I’ve just had my second. I don’t have any back pains or even really pelvic floor issues.
    I do have the bulging look, though. I’ve tested over and over to see if I have diastasis and I can’t figure out if I do or not. I’m trying exercises but when I do my exercises I get pain in my abdomen. Is this normal?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Rachael,
      Sometimes it can be really hard to determine if you have diastasis or not. This is where it can be helpful to have someone with more experienced palpation skills perform a test. However, it sounds like diastasis or not, you are experiencing pain and discomfort that could very well be related to Functional Core Weakness (FCW). In fact, diastasis recti, along with back pain, hernias, some digestive issues, some pelvic floor dysfunction, and other common ailments are all symptoms of FCW. Our core rehabilitation program addresses all of these things. If you are having pain when you exercise, it’s best to stop and rehabilitate your core because it’s likely you are compensating for lack of core strength and could lead to further injury. We would love to work with you. Our programs are on sale all month long.

  105. Tom says:

    Will using an ab toning belt help or hinder the condition.

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      An ab belt will likely not be helpful. However, an abdominal rehab splint, which is designed to support the optimal function of the transverse, can help. But, it is highly recommended splinting be done in conjunction with rehabilitation for guidance. Splinting alone is rarely helpful. We sell abdominal splints in our store. Here is a link to more information on it: https://thetummyteam.com/splinting/why-splint/

  106. Gemma says:

    Hi
    So I had an ultra sound which pointed out I have a hernia behind my belly button, to which the specialist told me that he’s not going to do anything about it and then I noticed I’ve got a two finger gap down my abdomen. For the past week I’ve been feeling movement in my tummy, almost baby like movement and then today, I filmed my belly when I was lying down as you could see movement going on around my belly button which also looked like a baby moving.
    Has anyone ever experienced movement like this with a hernia and diastasis recti? It’s got me wandering whether it is my intestines or something that I can see moving?

  107. FTM says:

    I’m 43, 5’2 and weigh the most I ever have, other than pregnant, at 125. I have put on 10 pounds in the last 2 years. I keep saying it’s cause I’m over 40. I’m wondering if all my lifelong issues might be from a diastasis recti. I’m very active and have never let pain get in my way. But lately it has. While googling what could be wrong with me I stumbled on DR. I did the self test and can definitely feel about 3-4 fingers between my tummy muscles. My stomach cones out when doing sit-ups, not just after pregnancy. I can’t remember it not doing that! On to what I think might be all related to DR. I have had trouble passing bowel movements since age 15. I have to press on my perinium to eliminate. I always chalked it up to competitive horse jumping messing me up along with heavy feed sack lifting and stall cleaning. I was too embarrassed to tell anyone of it. During the latter part of each of my 4 pregnancies I had a burning, then numbness sensation in my upper right abdomen while seated (especially driving). I was told this was normal. After my 3rd child was born, I had a uterine prolapse while having a bowel movement. I still have trouble with that, especially during my cycle. Seems that everything loosens up a bit more. I also have tremendous gas pain during my cycles in the last few years. I have been doing yoga off and on since my first pregnancy 15 years ago which seems to help tighten things up down there and relieve chronic neck and sciatic pain from old horse riding injuries. About 4 years ago, I was working on a construction project and was bent over in a tight space. While putting pressure on a drill I felt something catch under my right rib cage. I tried to straighten up and gradually the catch inside me rolled itself out. I have had the sensation many times when in similar situations. As time has gone on, using a shovel has caused a burning sensation and pain centered between my ribs. It has progressively become worse to the point I have had to stop riding my horse or working the garden and push the painful area back in place. Lately, I feel like I have painfully eaten too much, the pain and tight feeling reaches around towards my back. My stomach looks so fat up under my ribs. The fullness and pain have been somewhat constant for several months now. Other than lifting with a shovel or pitch fork, sitting down seems to be the most uncomfortable. I feel bloated, but up very high under my ribs. I want to prop a pillow behind my back thinking it will relieve the pressure feeling. Driving carpool and waiting on kids in the pick up line is torture. I have just recently had an abdominal ultrasound and numerous blood tests. All of which came back normal. They were looking for tumors, gall bladder or liver issues, and hernias. They want to schedule me for a cat scan, next. I feel like I’m falling apart. Maybe you can help me tell the doc what to look for in the cat scan?

  108. TheTummyTeam says:

    Hi there,

    I am so sorry you’ve been dealing with some of these things since you were so young. It’s not uncommon for us to hear women say they were too embarrassed to talk about their symptoms. We get it.
    It’s possible the horse riding set you up with some compensation strategies — maybe your body got in the habit of using the wrong muscles for the wrong job. Lifting in the wrong posture all those years also was likely putting chronic excess pressure against your abdominal wall. Over time, this creates micro-tears in the connective tissue making it more susceptible to stretching (diastasis recti), and even tearing (a true hernia). Then add the pregnancies to the mix and the growing uterus, the birthing process, and the chronic parenting postures you were in just made for the perfect storm. Every symptoms you’re describing (burning pain, constipation, bloating, prolapse, coning shape….) it’s all a part of not just Diastasis Recti, but of Functional Core Weakness. Your internal corset muscles that are responsible for being your main stabilizing postural muscle is weak and atrophied. When this happens, digestion slows down, gravity pulls the organs onto the pelvic floor increasing pressure, and then your body begins to recruit any other nearby muscles to stabilize leading to back pain, pelvic pain (sciatica, SI instability, etc), and more.

    It sounds like you are pursing every possible avenue to reclaim your health. We would love to be a part of your journey and I am confident that we can help you with most of these pains and dysfunctions you have been living with for so long. I would recommend starting with our Core Foundations Online Course and an Abdominal Rehab Splint. If you can afford it, I’d highly recommend you also book an eSession with our specialists to further guide your rehab journey because it sounds like there is a lot of disconnection there.

    That course will take care of a lot of your symptoms, even the pelvic floor symptoms. But depending on how bad your prolapse is, you may still need some follow up pelvic floor work. If that’s the case, you can enroll in our pelvic floor “add on” course later on (this is a course just for Core Foundations “graduates”) to address any lingering problems.

    I hope this encourages you to find these answers. Take a breath, we can help.

  109. TheTummyTeam says:

    Thank you for your comment. Yes, we have had clients with this symptom before. When the abdominal wall is weak and thin and the connective tissue is stretched and thin then it is easy to see your digestive tract move while lying on your back. It can be a bit disturbing. Our approach is to rebuild your corset muscle which helps it become thicker while closing the diastasis and allowing that connective tissue to reabsorb and build tension. This also better supports the GI tract and allows your intestines to work more effectively. Core Foundations would be an excellent course for you.

  110. Melissa says:

    I was told about 9 years ago, 3 years after second child born, I had separated muscle. Didn’t cause me pain then. I gained a lot of weight with both pregnancies, and I am 5’3” about 115 lbs. had severe anxiety and started feeling pain in upper right abdomen right at base of ribs. Sometimes it radiates to my back. Sciatic problems on same side. Went quite awhile without much trouble, but I was also excercisibg and doing yoga. Now it’s flaring up again. It’s a dull burning sensation and it’s not deep inside feels like top layer of muscle. Sometimes it feels bruised to push on it. Dr checked me out and poked and prodded around major organs. Found nothing. Think this is DR flaring up??

  111. Ann says:

    I have just been to see a sugeon as my Dr suspected I had another umbilical hernia.
    My symptoms are, enlarged stomach, none or very small appetite and a very large bulge above my tummy button while lifting my head when lying on my back or even at a sitting position. I am having trouble with leaking from my bladder.
    The bulge is the size of a half water melon ( and the shape of half a dinasaur egg!)
    The surgeon seems to think it is not a hernia, he thinks it may be D/R, but is not sure why I am in such pain and being sick if I hit my tummy, he said it shouldn’t hurt?
    I am 63, 5’3” and 116lb’s, heavier than I should be as I can only manage 700-800 caleries a day!!!!

    I have 4 children but was pregnant 5 times, the misscarriage was at 20 weeks.
    He has ordered a cat scan and wants a camera put down my throat.
    Am I having normal symptoms?

  112. Andrea says:

    @Melissa Sounds similar to me. GI doctor thinks it is my gallbladder/gallstones maybe. Going for an ultrasound tomorrow and then endoscopy on Friday.

  113. TheTummyTeam says:

    Since it feels more superficial and asymmetrical, it does not present like a typical diastasis or transverse abdominis pain. It could very likely be a compensation pattern on the right side since you feel it along your ribs, your back and your pelvis/sciatic area. Most moms have residual tightness on the left side from holding babies more on the left than the right. Your body tries to find its way back to midline and returning to yoga and exercise may have really triggered that. The right side could be trying hard to find a balance for the left. When we do functional core rehab we work on the transverse abdominis which is the only muscle to wrap around your body and give you symmetry. Once your body has this foundational symmetry we can release those compensation strategies that are pulling on the pelvis and rib cage.

  114. TheTummyTeam says:

    I am so sorry, I know this is frustrating. While it is not common to have a lot of pain with diastasis recti, if the muscles are really being stretched then it can feel pretty tender and vulnerable. Your symptoms are pretty common with diastasis recti and the functional core weakness that is often connected to it. I would recommend you consider our Core Foundations online program. I feel confident we can help you feel and function so much better with some intentional functional core rehab. Let us know if you have more questions.

  115. angela says:

    I have scoliosis of the spine and my lower back pain has been getting worse.since June I have had pelvic pain and since I have a history of bladerr infections I was given cipro 1000 mg a day for 10 days & I had 3 urine cultures ,and they were all negative.this has been going on since june and the abdominal pain has been getting worse.I have had 3 children the biggest 9lbs 11ozs and i am a petite woman.all were born naturraly

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Thank you for reaching out. Scoliosis combined with a weak core can cause the body to collapse asymmetrically. This could absolutely be a factor in your low back pain and your pelvic pain. Sometimes the poor pelvic connection can present in an irritated bladder. I would actually recommend functional core rehab that focuses on your internal core strength, neutral pelvic alignment, and coordination with your pelvic floor. Our online Core Foundations Program could be so helpful for you. We have been so impressed with how multiple (seemingly unrelated) symptoms resolve when the core is supporting the body well. We would love to help you.

  116. Jully says:

    I have had the bulging tummy, lower back problems and excessive snoring for the past few years. I had a hysterectomy 2 years ago that removed a large 14 cm fibroid. I have had 2 c-sections. I play tennis and am in decent shape for 57 but have this bulge below my bra and have only recently learned it is due to diastasis recti (DR). I believe all this is feeding off the DR. I do struggle to breath at times when I play tennis and this has been a problem for the past 5-6 years. I saw a plastic surgeon who said I had severe DR. Are these all related, including the breathing problems and sleep apnea? Will fixing the DR improve or resolve the breathing and lower back issues?

    • TheTummyTeam says:

      Hi Jully,
      Sadly, yes all of these symptoms are related. We have helped thousands of people heal their diastasis and when you heal yours, this will definitely help with your back pain and breathing issues. Snoring and sleep apnea might be connected but also have other contributing factors so I cannot say if functional core rehab will help in those areas. Tennis is a great sport but if your body is bracing and bulging while you play it might be contributing to why your diastasis is not healing. Rebuilding the internal core muscle is key to healing the diastasis and then building up the coordination to properly activate your core while exercising will help your body be stronger and pain-free. We would love to see you at our clinic if you are local. If not, Core Foundations would be a good fit for you. Peruse our website and let us know how we can help you.

  117. Jane says:

    I had a uterine ablation that was followed by abscess on my uterus. I had to have a DNC and reopen the uterine wall all within 4 months. I have been dealing with a low belly “pouch” ever since. Can I have diastasis recti even though I was never pregnant?

  118. TheTummyTeam says:

    Thank you for reaching out. Any abdominal trauma (surgery is a trauma) can cause a disconnect and result in poor stabilization strategies in your core. You could have a diastasis, but you likely for sure have functional core weakness. The muscles that typically hold your abdomen in and keep you connected may have stopped doing that temporarily. That would explain some of your symptoms if not all of them. I would highly recommend you consider our Core Foundations program as it focuses on rebuilding that functional core strength and will likely help you tremendously in a short amount of time.

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